Scientists Monitor Shishaldin Volcano for Signs of Eruption


https://earthchangesmedia.com/scientists-monitor-shishaldin-volcano-for-signs-of-eruption
Scientists at the Alaska Volcano Observatory are going to be keeping a close eye on Shishaldin Volcano over the weekend.
The volcano emitted a small ash cloud that was identified early Friday morning. AVO geologist Chris Waythomas says the cloud drifted south of the volcano and…

Scientists at the Alaska Volcano Observatory are going to be keeping a close eye on Shishaldin Volcano over the weekend.

The volcano emitted a small ash cloud that was identified early Friday morning. AVO geologist Chris Waythomas says the cloud drifted south of the volcano and dissipated.

“However, Shishaldin is a very frequently active volcano, and this could mean that we’re heading into an eruptive period,” he says. “It may not necessarily, but it wouldn’t surprise us if the volcano started getting more active.”

Shishaldin was upgraded to a yellow alert level last week after abnormal behavior began. Waythomas says this ash cloud seems to have come from a combination of magma close to the surface, and increased steaming and temperatures in the crater.

Some of the seismic monitoring stations that track Shishaldin are still out of order. Waythomas says they’re relying on two functioning stations to look for earthquakes inside the volcano and other changes that could foretell an eruption.

“It can be explosive, and it could put ash clouds up to flight levels,” he says. “That would not be unusual for this volcano to do that.”

Shishaldin’s eruption in 1999 sent ash plumes as high as 45,000 feet above sea level. It last erupted in 2004, and the last time it showed unrest like this was in 2009.

Shishaldin is the highest peak in the Aleutians. It’s also the world’s most symmetrical glacier-covered, conical volcano.

Waythomas says the two other yellow-alert volcanoes in the Aleutians — Cleveland and Veniaminof — are mostly quiet right now.

 

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Mitch Battros is a scientific journalist who is highly respected in both the scientific and spiritual communities due to his unique ability to bridge the gap between modern science and ancient text. Founded in 1995 – Earth Changes TV was born with Battros as its creator and chief editor for his syndicated television show. In 2003, he switched to a weekly radio show as Earth Changes Media. ECM quickly found its way in becoming a top source for news and discoveries in the scientific fields of astrophysics, space weather, earth science, and ancient text. Seeing the need to venture beyond the Sun-Earth connection, in 2016 Battros advanced his studies which incorporates our galaxy Milky Way - and its seemingly rhythmic cycles directly connected to our Solar System, Sun, and Earth driven by the source of charged particles such as galactic cosmic rays, gamma rays, and solar rays. Now, "Science Of Cycles" is the vehicle which brings the latest cutting-edge discoveries confirming his published Equation.
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