Year’s Best Meteor Shower from Halley’s Comet


http://earthchangesmedia.com/years-best-meteor-shower-from-halleys-comet
As Earth orbits the Sun, it continually ploughs through dust and debris left behind by passing comets and asteroids. On any night of the year, a keen-eyed observer might see five, or even ten, meteors (shooting stars) per hour.

But over the next week, that number will rise markedly, as Earth…

As Earth orbits the Sun, it continually ploughs through dust and debris left behind by passing comets and asteroids. On any night of the year, a keen-eyed observer might see five, or even ten, meteors (shooting stars) per hour.

halley_comet2

But over the next week, that number will rise markedly, as Earth moves through the center of a stream of debris left behind by the most famous of all comets, comet 1P/Halley.

Most meteor showers have a short, sharp maximum that is best observed over a single night or two. But the Orionid meteors (which have already been active for a couple of weeks) will really kick into action this weekend, and should remain close to their peak for most of next week. Best viewing is likely on or around Tuesday evening, October 21.

Comet 1P/Halley is probably the best known of a vast population of dirty snowballs that circle the Sun. Every 76 years or so, it swings through the inner solar system.

As it flies by the Sun, ice on the comet’s surface sublimates (changes directly from solid to gas) to space. The ice carries with it vast quantities of dust and debris, causing the comet to shrink by about a meter with every apparition.

 

From the release of this gas and dust, as the comet sheds its skin it grows a magnificent tail and coma, making it easily visible with the unaided eye, once per generation.

The dust shed by the comet continues through space, following a very similar path to the comet itself.

Comet Halley has been trapped in its current orbit for thousands of years. The shells of dust ejected each time it has passed by the Sun, have gradually dispersed. They now form a wide tube of dust, sheathing the comet’s path.

Twice per year, once in May, and again in October, the Earth runs into this debris and sparks a meteor shower.

The shower in May, the Eta Aquarids, is actually the most impressive, as Earth passes closer to the centre of the debris swathe left by the comet. This means that the shower provides more meteors per hour, as we run through thicker dust. Unfortunately, it is hard to see, and is only really visible for a couple of hours before dawn.

The October Orionids, by contrast, are visible from around midnight onwards, and can still put on a spectacular show.

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About Earth Changes Media w/ Mitch Battros

Mitch Battros is a scientific journalist who is highly respected in both the scientific and spiritual communities due to his unique ability to bridge the gap between modern science and ancient text. Founded in 1995 – Earth Changes TV was born with Battros as its creator and chief editor for his syndicated television show. In 2003, he switched to a weekly radio show as Earth Changes Media. ECM quickly found its way in becoming a top source for news and discoveries in the scientific fields of astrophysics, space weather, earth science, and ancient text. Seeing the need to venture beyond the Sun-Earth connection, in 2016 Battros advanced his studies which incorporates our galaxy Milky Way - and its seemingly rhythmic cycles directly connected to our Solar System, Sun, and Earth driven by the source of charged particles such as galactic cosmic rays, gamma rays, and solar rays. Now, "Science Of Cycles" is the vehicle which brings the latest cutting-edge discoveries confirming his published Equation.
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