Storm Forces Evacuation Of 1,000 People In Argentina


http://earthchangesmedia.com/storm-forces-evacuation-of-1000-people-in-argentina
The Argentine government on Wednesday activated an emergency plan to help those affected by the powerful storm that struck 17 municipalities in Buenos Aires province over the past 24 hours and forced authorities to evacuate about 1,000 people.
Argentine Cabinet chief Jorge Capitanich held a…

The Argentine government on Wednesday activated an emergency plan to help those affected by the powerful storm that struck 17 municipalities in Buenos Aires province over the past 24 hours and forced authorities to evacuate about 1,000 people.

Argentine Cabinet chief Jorge Capitanich held a press conference at which he provided details of the damage caused by the storm in different parts of the country, mainly in Buenos Aires province, as well as in Entre Rios, southern Cordoba and Santa Fe.

Capitanich said that authorities are carrying out “coordinated work on the ground with the provincial municipal authorities” to help those in need.

Of the 1,000 people evacuated, 100 were from the city of Bragado, 500 km (310 mi.) from Buenos Aires, where a small tornado with wind gusts of more than 120 kph (74 mph) ripped the roofs off 70 homes, completely destroyed the downtown market and caused power outages, among other things.

The cabinet chief said that Edenor, one of the electricity companies that operates in Buenos Aires province, had 50,000 user connections without power, while Edesur had 200,000.

In the town of Lujan, 70 km (43 mi.) from the capital, a red alert was declared by authorities due to the 4-meter (13-foot) rise in the same-named river there and about a dozen families were evacuated, volunteer firefighters said.

More than 30 flights were cancelled at the two Buenos Aires airports – Ezeiza and Jorge Newbery – and dozens more were delayed.

Bragado police chief Sergio Ledesma early in the day informed the media about the damage, but he emphasized that no injuries had been reported and said the situation was “normalizing” itself.

One of the areas hardest hit by the storm was the corridor in which Avellaneda, Lanus, Lomas de Zamora and Quilmes are located, on the outskirts of Buenos Aires, where rivers and creeks overflowed and trees were knocked over.

In the capital itself, where rail and metro lines were temporarily shut down and/or trains delayed, the rain flooded many streets resulting in traffic chaos at morning rush hour.

According to the National Weather Service, or SMN, a storm alert is in effect up until 8 p.m. in Buenos Aires and other parts of the same-named province, as well as in the central province of Entre Rios and the southern provinces of Cordoba and Santa Fe.

SMN meteorologist Miriam Andrioli told Efe that during the 16 hours it has been raining without letup in the capital 134 mm (5.3 inches) have fallen, although the average rainfall for all of October is just 119 mm (4.7 inches). EFE

Related posts:

Advertisements

About Earth Changes Media w/ Mitch Battros

Mitch Battros is a scientific journalist who is highly respected in both the scientific and spiritual communities due to his unique ability to bridge the gap between modern science and ancient text. Founded in 1995 – Earth Changes TV was born with Battros as its creator and chief editor for his syndicated television show. In 2003, he switched to a weekly radio show as Earth Changes Media. ECM quickly found its way in becoming a top source for news and discoveries in the scientific fields of astrophysics, space weather, earth science, and ancient text. Seeing the need to venture beyond the Sun-Earth connection, in 2016 Battros advanced his studies which incorporates our galaxy Milky Way - and its seemingly rhythmic cycles directly connected to our Solar System, Sun, and Earth driven by the source of charged particles such as galactic cosmic rays, gamma rays, and solar rays. Now, "Science Of Cycles" is the vehicle which brings the latest cutting-edge discoveries confirming his published Equation.
This entry was posted in Extreme Weather and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.